Wood Types Available

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Maple Maple
A closed grain wood that is white with a slight reddish brown tinge in color. This species is difficult to stain due to changing grain patterns in the close grain wood and any stain applied could appear blotchy on the end grain. The sapwood is creamy white with a slight reddish brown tinge and the heartwood varies from light to dark reddish brown. The amount of darker brown heartwood can vary significantly according to growing region.
Alder Alder
Principally grown in the Pacific Northwest, it is the most abundant commercial hardwood and is one of the lighter weight hardwoods in North America. . It was once consider a trash species and used for fuel. The wood of alder is nearly 100% sapwood. Alder, a relative of birch, is almost white when freshly cut but quickly changes on exposure to air, becoming light brown with a yellow or reddish tinge. It is a relatively soft hardwood of medium density that has low bending strength, shock resistance and stiffness.
Cherry Cherry
Like all fruit trees, cherry belongs to the rose family. It has a rich closed grain wood that is reddish in color. The heartwood of cherry varies from rich red to reddish brown and will darken with age and on exposure to light. In contrast, the sapwood is creamy white. Sapwood is the major part of this wood and is allowed on the finished product. The wood is of medium density and is readily available.
Hickory/Pecan Hickory/Pecan
Eastern U.S., principal commercial areas: Central and Southern states. Tree height ranges from 60 to 120 feet. Botanically they are split into two groups; the true hickories, and the pecan hickories (fruit bearing) and is the first strictly American hardwood species. The wood is virtually the same for both and is usually sold together. Hickory is the hardest, heaviest and strongest American wood.
Red Oak Red Oak
An open grain wood that is pink to red in color. It stains easily with a varying degree of stain penetration depending upon grain structure. The oaks are by far the most abundant species group growing in the Eastern hardwood forests. The wood is hard and heavy, with medium bending strength and stiffness and high crushing strength. Abundant. Most widely used species.
Pacific Maple Pacific Maple
Grown principally in the Pacific Northwest, where it is an abundant commercial hardwood. PC Maple is easy on the pocket book; it’s about half the cost of hard maple. Its color is pale pinkish-brown to almost white. Generally there is no marked difference between heartwood and sapwood. PC maple has medium density, but is slightly harder than eastern soft maple.
Mahogany Mahogany
Mahogany has a generally straight grain and is usually free of voids and pockets. It has a reddish-brown color which darkens over time, and displays a beautiful reddish sheen when polished. It has excellent workability, and is very durable.
Beech
Known as "Mother of the Forest" for its nutrient-rich humus. The sapwood is white with a red tinge, while the heartwood is light to dark reddish brown. The wood is generally straight-grained with a close uniform texture. Beech is classed as heavy, hard, strong, high in resistance to shock and highly suitable for steam bending.
Paint Grade Popular Paint Grade Popular
Sapwood is creamy white and may be streaked, with the hardwood varying form pale yellow brown to olive green. Fine textured, soft and lightweight. Easily worked and takes paint exceptionally well. Frequently finished to look like other woods.